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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
to ucla. he ended up going to do ucla. >> you are on the campus of usc. >> we won't get excited about that. so much of what he did with his life was an example. after his sports career, he became a businessman. a very successful businessman. he pointed out things and with regard to economics that black americans needed to know about. he was very -- very much a wall model and mentor in many of the aspects of his life. >> that's call from our viewing audience is lisa in nashville. caller: thank you for taking my call. i love c-span 2 and "book tv." mr. kareem abdul-jabbar, it is such an honor to talk you into here about the book you have written. i knew you were an author, but i did not realize how many books you have written. what was the title of your first book and how do you decide on the subjects of iraq's? >> the title of my first book was a giant steps. it is my biography. i'm a pretty tall person, i take long steps. that's how i got the title of my book. but i choose my subject matter with regards to how to impact people and explain things about american life that a lot of people are
there are three exceptions -- uc-berkeley, ucla, the university of michigan, they did not garner the same amount of racial and ethnic diversity using alternatives. but what is notable is that those three universities are the ones that are most likely to draw on a national pool of applicants, which means that the number of black and hispanic students is likely to be depressed for an artificial reason. these are the schools that have to compete with other schools on an unfair playing field against competitors who are free to continue to use racial preferences in admissions. so a highly talented students of color who gets into uc- berkeley without a racial preference is also likely to be admitted to an even more competitive institution like stanford with a racial preference. it is not surprising that university of michigan, uc- berkeley, and ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions which do not to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduate school? rick sander is here from ucla law school. we will hear from him about the
that we did at ucla, back in 1988, because of the height difference between michael dukakis, the democratic nominee and george herbert walker bush who is four or five inches taller than him. we to build a bubble in front of the podium for governor dukakis to stand on so he would appear relatively the same height. it is little things like that that we have to deal with. >> tell us about a little thing like that as far as this debate. the podium or the temperature in the room. >> well, you know, we try to keep the temperature at 65 degrees. i always tell my wife and daughters when they come, bring a pashmina because the hall is very, very cold. has to be with the lights and cameras. we try to keep it there. sometimes it varies. the podiums will always be the same size for the men and women who participate in these debates. and so, you know, we sit down, we work with the staff of our professional staff and then they -- each of the candidates also has a staff that is here. we walk them through, showing how things will go. as you know, we'll take both candidates through this afte
academic colleagues at ucla where i've been getting a phd. for the first one i'd like to make, one thing that sets the tea party apart from many others if they have a very traditional review. so essentially, they have this view america's land of opportunity and that all people regardless of backgrounds can succeed. now this is not to say, but they have this even more so and this is how the answer poll questions and how they help explain a lot of there there policy positions that other people have a hard time understanding. the scope of this. so these are some signs i took at a washington d.c. tea party protest here by the capital. you often see signs like this. don't spread my wealth. spread my work ethic. stop punishing and rewarding failure. this is all part of a common thing. and for this to make sense, i think we should go for some polling data. i'm going to show you some polling numbers that i've conducted with the recent rupaul that i directed the foundation. why actually had an opportunity to ask americans in general, but also tea partiers about how they perceive the fairness abou
promise to come back as a doctor and put their health come i went to ucla and then to harvard medical school where became the first latino to receive three graduate degrees from harvard. true to my promise, i came home as an er doctor at eisenhower medical center. i am living proof that the american dream. but for too many people, the american dream is endangered because washington is broken. too many workers have lost their jobs. too many retirees have lost their saving and too many students can't afford college. and congress and our congress on have lost touch with the people. instead of looking out for us, they are focused on partisan bickering, scoring political points of looking out for themselves and wealthy donors. congresswoman bono mack's response is more at the same. more bickering, more partisanship. and were looking out for yourself instead of us. instead of listening to people in proposing world solution, the congresswoman replies on the same partisan playbook that does nothing to create jobs or fixed income. watch tonight how many times you pass around empty phrases like
years of the reagan administration. he taught economics at ucla and at the martin smith school of business and economics at cal state. he holds a ph.d. in economics from the university of california los angeles and a master of public policy from uc- berkeley. our second speaker is stephen fuller, the doctor is a professor of public policy and regional development at george mason university and has been there since 1994 parody served as director of the ph.d. program on public policy from july 1998 through june of 2000 and from july 2001 to july 2002. he served as director of the center for regional analysis. he previously taught at george washington university 25 years, including nine as chairman of the department of urban planning and real estate development and as director of a doctoral programs for the school business of public management. his research focuses on the changing structure of metropolitan area economies and especially on the impact of federal spending, including two studies completed within the past year that consider the economic effects of sequestration. in oct
. and later vice president george bush and michael dukakis in 1988 from ucla. that's at 9:50 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> to focus on the presidential debates this month, c-span is asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of c-span's student cam video documentary competition. students will answer what's the most important issue that the president should answer for a chance to win $5,000 and there's $50,000 in total prizes. it's open for students age 6 through 12. go online to studentcam.org. >> next, republican ted cruz will debate paul saddler for the open texas senate seat vacated by kay bailey hutchyson. it's curtsy of kera tv. ted cruz is the former solictor of texas. it's just over an hour. >> this is the texas debate. we're broadcasting live from the kera studios in dallas and online at texasdebate.org. during the next hour i'll be the moderator for the final debate between republican ted cruz, the former solicitor of texas and paul saddler. welcome to our panelists -- ross ramsey, and pedro rojas, anchor for univision in houston. we invite you
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)